From May 18, 2017 to June 6, 2017, Heritage Montreal in partnership with Ivanhoé Cambridge is pleased to present its series of three guided tours under the theme At the Heart of the City. Each day, Montrealers travel the city by foot, bicycle or car, but rarely take the time to contemplate their surroundings. These three guided circuits offer the perfect opportunity to step out of the workaday routine and take a fresh look at the architectural gems that constitute the heart of our city.

Starting in front of Royal Victoria College—the three circuits explore various little-known downtown neighbourhoods that played a key role in the evolution of the city’s core. From the “McGill ghetto”, a residential district with its fascinating and varied architecture, to the vast University campus, one of downtown’s driving forces, and this area’s modernist architecture, each of these circuits reveals a distinct period, from the end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 21st.

PRACTICAL INFORMATION

This series of 90 minutes guided tours are offered in English, Tuesdays and Thursdays nights, at 5:30 p.m., From May 18, 2017 to June 6, 2017, (visits are also available in French). The tours are offered rain or shine.

Reservation are required. Please fill out the online form (to register in French, click here).

Departure: in front of Royal Victoria College, 3425, University Street.

Our members benefit from a preferential rate. Become a member here.

For more information contact Andréanne Jalbert-Laramée, Educational Activities Coordinator: architectours@heritagemontreal.org or 514 286-2662 ext. 21.

Many thanks to our partner:

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Circuits

Building a home: 19th-century houses

Commonly known as the McGill Ghetto, the sector situated immediately to the east of the McGill campus and extending to Parc/de Bleury was part of the Square Mile. At a more modest scale than the sector to the west, it was completely built out from 1875 to 1915, and the varied architectural language of the houses is representative of the clientele for whom they were built including university professors.

Thursday May 18
Tuesday May 30

Building a modern downtown: de Maisonneuve after 1945

Modernism in architecture, that ‘decisive rupture with the past’, only really arrived in Montreal with the construction of Place Ville Marie in 1962 – but that’s what makes the slice of downtown between Sherbrooke and De Maisonneuve from Mansfield to de Bleury so interesting. In this commercial district one can see the move towards modernism, expressed by a new generation of architects.

Tuesday May 23 (in English and in French)
Thursday June 1 (in English and in French)

Building a contemporary university: the McGill campus from the 1960s to today

The campus was an integral part of the Square Mile and a generating force of Montreal’s downtown. McGill’s buildings reflect its three successive waves of development: the 1890s, the 1960s and the early 2000s. Looking at what the university has built over the last fifty years is a fascinating core sample of architecture, a way of understanding how the institution has grown and of its continued influence on downtown.

Thursday May 25 (in English and in French)
Tuesday June 6 (in English and in French)

Rates

$15 for non-members
$12 for seniors and students
$10 for Heritage Montreal members (with valid membership card)

Access Card (participation in all three visits)
$40 for adults | $32 for students and seniors | $26 for Heritage Montreal members

Payment on-site, cash only. Rain or shine.